How do I Leave a Good Legacy?

We are so  honored to be with you each day sharing hope. Our outreach has grown at a tremendous pace. We are averaging over 100 new subscribers a day. We just past 97,700 in followers. That’s because people are searching for hope and we provide it.

We are starting a new promotion and the winner will be the person who is the 100,000 subscriber will win some nice prizes. That is a huge milestone for us. More details later. 

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Doug Bolton, the founder of Signs of Hope, is writing  a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, PTSD, and many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. We need to help stop those statistics. Be looking for more details about the new book. Doug just interviewed a WWII veteran, for the book.  Fascinating! Look for updates here.

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Do you know someone who you feel will leave a tremendous legacy for what they have done, or are now doing?

How are they different than you? What can you do to leave a legacy you will be proud of?

We see others getting blessings, and awards.  They receive them with great humbleness, and dignity.

So, how you are feeling when you see them receiving the awards? Are you envious? Do you resent them getting an award and not you?

Envy is the resentment of the blessing of someone else, and somehow diminishes your own self-worth.

Envy is destruction of your legacy.

One of the ultimate showing of humbleness, and integrity was David. Saul eventually hated David, because he was so loved by the people even more than he was.  David had to go into hiding because Saul was wanting to kill him.

Then Saul died. You know what David did? He wept. He cried for days. He felt like he had lost a father even though Saul wanted him dead.

He wasn’t envious of Saul when he was in power. He was a loyal warrior. He was one of the top generals of the warriors who fought for Saul. His legacy still lives today over 2,000 years later.

How can we get rid of any envy in our lives?

  • Concentrate on God. Put Him first in your life. Learn about Him in the Bible and study how others there built up their own legacy.
  • Consider others above yourself. Yes, this one can be hard. But when you do this consistently people will look up to you as a leader.
  • Rejoice in the victories of others. Again, this can be hard. It may be someone at work who is getting a promotion you may have felt should have been yours.
  • Be content with God made you to be, and what He will do for you later.

These four things will completely change your life. If you do each of these you will be building a legacy that will grow and show others how to also build their own legacy.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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What if You Didn’t Believe? Then What?

We are so  honored to be with you each day sharing hope. Our outreach has grown at a tremendous pace. We just past 95,775 in followers. That’s because people are searching for hope and we provide it.

WE HAVE A WINNER!! We will be notifying the winner by email, if they put in the right email address. I will also let you know about when the winner subscription happened, so you can know that it may be yours. 

We are starting a new promotion and the winner will be the person who is the 100,000 subscriber. That is a huge milestone for us. More details later. 

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Doug Bolton, the founder of Signs of Hope, is writing  a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, PTSD, and many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. We need to help stop those statistics. Be looking for more details about the new book. Doug just interviewed a WWII veteran, for the book.  Fascinating! Look for updates here.

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Welcome Back Lynn Mosher as our monthly guest blogger. She always give is pause to ponder. Tonight is not different. 

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I Had Fainted Unless…

“I had fainted, unless I had believed to see

the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living.”

(Ps. 27:13 KJV)

Here we go a-pondering! I love to do this. If you’re a fairly new reader, you’ll soon find out that I love to take apart a verse of scripture…by its definitions. New and deeper meanings are sometimes discovered. Let’s see what we can dig out of this one.

*The above verse in other versions:

NKJV: “I would have lost heart, unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living.”

New Living Version: “I would have been without hope if I had not believed that I would see the loving-kindness of the Lord in the land of the living.”

The thing is, “I had fainted,” “I would have lost heart,” or “I would have been without hope” are not in the original. The translators added those words.

In the original Hebrew of the Masoretic Text, it literally says, “Unless I had believed to see the goodness of Jehovah in the land of the living.” It breaks off abruptly, as if he had said, “Oh, had I not believed to see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living!” We are left to imagine what would have happened had he not believed.

Because of the efforts of his numerous and formidable enemies, David knew his only support and deliverance was God. He believed he would see His goodness. And he did.

*Definitions:

The Hebrew word for unless means if not, except, had not, or were it not that.

Believed means to build up or support, to be firm or faithful, to trust, to be true, to uphold, to nourish, to be established, confirm, enduring, etc.

The word for goodness means beauty, gladness, welfare, prosperity, joy, fairness, etc.

*Rewording

Lynn’s Version might say, “Oh, had I not I believed, trusted, and endured to see God’s beauty, welfare, prosperity, and joy!” If we do not believe, how do we see the evidence of God’s goodness?

Doesn’t that remind you of Hebrews 11:1? “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not being seen.” (The Received Greek Text)

*Application/encouragement:

Because David sought the Lord and believed in His goodness, he said in an earlier verse, “For in the time of trouble He shall hide me in His pavilion; in the secret place of His tabernacle He shall hide me; He shall set me high upon a rock.” (Ps. 27:5 NKJV)

David went on to say in verse 14, “Wait on the Lord; be of good courage, and He shall strengthen your heart; wait, I say, on the Lord!” (NKJV)

David’s main message of the whole psalm is wait, hope, and trust in the Lord. So, when you are in the midst of any trouble, always believe and have courage as you wait for the Lord to act on your behalf.

Be encouraged that, in your waiting, the Lord will strengthen you and will hide you in His secret place.

If I had not believed in God’s goodness and His working, deliverance, and love and waited for Him in my life and circumstances, I wonder what would have happened to me? Oh, I shudder even to think about it!

What would have happened to you if you had not believed to see the goodness of God in some trial or circumstance? What will happen in the future if you don’t believe?

From His feet, Lynn

lynnmosher.com

 

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There Are Threads of Hope if You Look

Threads of Hope

Linda S. Clare

“And He has said to me, ‘My grace is sufficient for you, for power is perfected in weakness.’” –II Corinthians 12:9 NIV

 

I’m acquainted with a wonderful mother who recently posted on Facebook that she’d goofed, big time. A devout Christian, she’d mistakenly outlined her son’s latest substance abuse crisis in a public rather than a private forum, embarrassing all involved. In her apology, she begged those who’d read the post to forget, it or at least refrain from discussing it. I never saw the post in question, but I sensed her humiliation at exposing her not-so-perfect life. This mother’s pain was palpable and familiar. Although I wept with her, it’s shown me again why the strongest hope is often made of the worst weakness.

I know how it feels to show your strong side to the world while some calamity threatens to swallow you whole. For those of us with addiction or mental health issues—our own or those of loved ones—we not only ignore the elephant in the room, we tell ourselves that elephants are overrated. We say, “Stand back! I got this,” even if we’re marching into battle feeling very alone. In our culture, admitting weakness often gets you punched in the nose.

Sometimes God gives us super human strength. That’s grace in action. Other times, we go it alone. We pray for protection, for healing, for blessing even as we present our “game face” to the world. We “battle” cancer, as if willpower can beat the big “C.” We present the perfect picture, even when we’re falling apart.

The poor mom who posted the private info must have worried about looking weak. She’d placed her family in the cross hairs of a judgmental society, inviting strangers to shame, blame or even claim her faith was insufficient. I don’t blame her—it’s happened to me.

I once worked in a Christian bookstore, restocking everything from Bibles to greeting cards. I was grateful for the job—in addition to supporting our family, my left arm’s lifelong paralysis from childhood polio made some simple tasks a little trickier for me. OK, a lot trickier. Still, I never called attention to my disability and always wore an “I got this” face to customers.

One day two women came into the bookstore, where I was straightening greeting cards. After I asked if I could help them find something, one woman leaned closer. She whispered, “God would heal your arm—if you had more faith.” The women left the store while I stood there, waiting for my head to explode.

Later in the breakroom, I cried hot tears of anger and confusion. I railed at God. On the job, I’d never asked for any special treatment. At work, my daily attitude was “I got this.” I had no idea how to make my faith the size it needed to be.

I never saw those women again. But for years after, I couldn’t give myself a break. Then I developed the late effects of polio. Pain and fatigue dogged me, yet I kept overworking my sore muscles. When family members developed substance abuse and mental health problems, I was as determined as that mother on Facebook to show the world how strong I was.

Then one night I dreamed of an abyss, with a single gossamer thread stretched taut across it. The hole was the blackest black, a velvet chasm of despair, while the thread glimmered in the low light. My thread of hope was so fragile, so bare, it would surely break under the weight of the disasters in my life.

Too terrified to say, “I got this,” I stood at the far end of this yawning chasm. I was naked and afraid, all right. Tattered hope stretched out before me but the thread slipped my grasp. The black hole snapped its jaws.

I know better than to put a lot of energy into interpreting dreams. Yet in this one, a hand suddenly appeared, a hand of light and pure love, if that’s possible. Discouraged by broken hope, I stood before this Love-light.

Darkness sneered at me. Fool—all is lost. For proof, just look at your addicted family members or that withered arm. Why bother to hope at all?

I understood that some hard things might never be healed this side of heaven. Why God allows suffering on earth is an age-old mystery. Darkness again whispered, “Abandon hope.” In that moment, I had to choose either my own strength or God’s weakness. The outstretched hand waited.

I chose weakness.

As feeble as I was, I reached for that hand of Light. Something—Someone—transported my failing body across the canyon, fortifying hope as it went. I had the sense I was being carried through the pain and mistakes and dumb moves of my life—and I need not claim any strength of my own.

When I awoke, nothing had changed. My body still ached. My family’s battles with substance abuse and diseases and mental health were as real as they’d ever been. The mother from Facebook no doubt still agonizes over her precious son, and if I were still working at the bookstore, those same women might still scold me for the smallness of my faith.

But everything had changed. Despair can wear hope thin, but God’s grace gives hope its strength—power perfected in weakness. To get past life’s pain, I must stand at the chasm’s edge every day. Learn to let go of the “I got this” mentality that keeps me from recognizing God when He offers me His hand. Threads of hope get stronger as Jesus carries me through, and as I lay aside my strength, He gently allows weakness to prevail.

The trials you face may be far bigger than mine. Maybe you’re much better at surrendering to God than I’ve ever been. But real strength is perfected in weakness. If you need a thread of hope today, put your hand in His hand and He will carry you through. “Trust Me,” He says, “I got this.”

 

Linda Clare

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The Meaning of Bethlehem

We are so  honored to be with you each day sharing hope. Our outreach has grown at a tremendous pace. We just past 93,525 in followers. That’s because people are searching for hope and we provide it. We have a new promotion going with prizes. The person who is our 95,000 follower will receive two nice prizes, which we will not name. (This is called a hook in writing.) The number of followers rises fast. We are averaging close to 30 new subscribers each day. So don’t hesitate! Click on the icon right after the title of this post to subscribe.

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Doug Bolton, the founder of Signs of Hope, is writing  a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It will be reaching out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, PTSD, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides ever day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics. Be looking for more details about the new book. Doug Is also seeking military who would be willing to do an interview. It will be part of the book. Sharing by actual soldiers will help many others. Look for updates here.

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Time for one of my favorite guest bloggers to post again. Lynn Mosher, speaks with compassion. and share so much hope. So glad your are still gracing our pages Lynn. 

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The Meaning of Bethlehem

 

Biblical names have always held great significance; so, what is Bethlehem’s history and description? This is very interesting.

Bethlehem’s original name was Ephratah, sometimes used in the shortened version as Ephrath (meaning fruitfulness or fruitful land). Located about five to six miles south of Jerusalem, Bethlehem is nestled in the district of Judah (meaning praise).

Tucked in among the fertile hills of Judah, the land of praise, laid this quiet little village, which later became known as Bethlehem-Ephratah and eventually became Bethlehem, meaning house of bread.

In the surrounding fields, a shepherd boy would pasture his father’s flocks and sing them the praises of his God. Much later, heavenly songs of praise would ascend above the fields, filling the atmosphere with angelic voices, welcoming the Redeemer of the world born here.

Do you see anything in all that?
If not, look again. The House of Bread dwelt in the fruitful land of Praise! As the lineage of Christ came through the bloodline of Judah, the land of Praise birthed “the Bread of God” from heaven. Praise unveiled the Bread of Life.

David said to God, “But You are holy, O You Who dwell in [the holy place where] the praises of Israel [are offered].” (Ps. 22:3 AMP)

This is where our spiritual food, the Living Bread, dwells: nestled in our hearts’ praises!

May Bethlehem live in your heart, filling it with sweet praise in this season of Christ’s birth.

 

Prayer: Lord, may all who read this welcome Bethlehem to live in their hearts, filling them with sweet praise, giving them the Bread of Life, especially as we celebrate this season of Christ’s birth.

Christmas blessings, Lynn

 

lynnmosher.com

 

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