How Do You Measure A Mom?

We are so  honored to be with you each day sharing hope. Our outreach has grown at a tremendous pace. We are averaging over 100 new subscribers a day. We just past 104,300 in followers. That’s because people are searching for hope and we provide it.

We are in a new promotion. The person who is our 105,000 will wins some nice prizes. We are only 700 away from our next goal . It goes very fast so don’t miss out. 

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Doug Bolton, the founder of Signs of Hope, is writing  a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, PTSD, and many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. We need to help stop those statistics. Be looking for more updates about the new book. 

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+ Update! The book has been sent to my editor recently. Now I wait and see how many red marks she will have in it. 🙂

There will be some incredible interviews with veterans in this book. Up to twenty different veterans agreed to let me ask them some very personal questions. Some answers will have you in tears.  Some are actually humorous. 

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How Do You Measure a Mom?

Measure defined means a unit or standard of measurement; the extent, dimensions, quantity, of something; any standard of comparison, estimation, or judgment; and so on. Some of the synonyms are model, example, scope, portion, scale, test, pattern, and gauge.

So, taking that into consideration, how do you measure a mother?

*by how tall she is?

*by the size of her brain?

*by the size of her gloves?

*by the size of her shoes?

Well, yes and no. As Christians, we usually use the ideal woman (or wife) description in Proverbs 31 as the standard of measurement. Her worth being far above rubies, so it says. In addition, verses 28-29 tell us:

Her children stand and bless her; so does her husband. He praises her with these words: “There are many fine women in the world, but you are the best of them all!” (TLB)

But how do you measure that?

*By their love for her in the eyes of her family, you can measure how tall she is.

*By the scope of her thoughts, words, and prayers, you can measure the size of her brain.

*By the extent of her giving and doing for her children, you can measure the size of her gloves.

*By where and how she walks, you can measure the size of her shoes.

I guess if we went by that, a valuable mom would then be very tall, have a very large head, and have large hands and feet. Well, I know that sounds silly. But not if you apply it spiritually.

I love this quote: “The measure of a woman’s character is not what she gets from her ancestors, but what she leaves her descendants.” ~ unknown

As a mother, how large am I, spiritually that is? How do I measure up to all this? How do I leave my daughter and my sons those values and character that I desire them to have? How do I make my husband and family proud of me and not bring shame to them? How am I an example to others?

To be and do all that is necessary, my life must mirror one pattern, one example, one standard…Jesus!

Other than the character traits of Proverbs 31, Paul listed several other traits in his letter to Titus.

The older women likewise, that they be reverent in behavior, not slanderers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things—that they admonish the young women to love their husbands, to love their children, to be discreet, chaste, homemakers, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God may not be blasphemed. (Titus 2:3-5 NKJV)

All this, plus grace, strength, and faith, was passed on to me by my mother and my grandmother…so what am I leaving to my children? How do they see me? How do others see me? How am I being measured?

Not all mothers can stand the scrutiny of the ideal mother description. Not every mother will be “the best of them all.” Many come from backgrounds that did not supply the best conditions for learning to be a great mom. Others lack the communication skills to relate properly with their children. Therefore, trusting in the Lord becomes essential.

Proverbs 31 is the survey for which every mother should self-analyze herself. Is she following the Lord in all she does? We all as mothers fall short. However, having the desire in a mother’s heart to show love and care to her children is the beginning.

If you are a mother reading this, what are you passing on to your children? How do others measure you?

Mother’s Day blessings…

Lynn

lynnmosher.com

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Look in a Mirror. You See God’s Image

We are so  honored to be with you each day sharing hope. Our outreach has grown at a tremendous pace. We are averaging over 100 new subscribers a day. We just past 103,300 in followers. That’s because people are searching for hope and we provide it.

We are in a new promotion. The person who is our 105,000 will wins some nice prizes. That is only 1,700 away It goes very fast so don’t miss out. 

_____________________________________

Doug Bolton, the founder of Signs of Hope, is writing  a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, PTSD, and many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. We need to help stop those statistics. Be looking for more updates about the new book. 

________________________________________

+ Update! The book has been sent to my editor recently. Now I wait and see how many red marks she will have in it. 🙂

There will be some incredible interviews with veterans in this book. Up to twenty different veterans agreed to let me ask them some very personal questions. Some answers will have you in tears.  

_______________________________________________

Life is hectic! Life is too fast! Life seems to be leaving me in the dust!

Do any of those statements fit you? I know your pain. The earth seems to be spinning way too fast. There have been times when I felt I want to let loose and allow the world to throw me off of this planet.

Before I actually check out of this hotel called earth, let me share some things with you:

  • I have said this meaning times, but all storms stop and then there is the Son!
  • Everytime I face adversity I seem to grow. Though it is very hard, I am stronger.
  • When I see someone else who is hurting and I reach out to help them, its seems to help  me as well. If I bring a smile to their face, I have one on my face too.
  • If I fall into the muck and mire of life, God is always there to pull me out.

We need to know who saved us, and how He defines we are. Do you know who you are under God’s love?

Genesis 1:26-28

Let me put it this way. God created everyone of us in His own image. He doesn’t make mistakes. He created you for a reason.

You are very special. He didn’t create you like any other creature. We weren’t created to look like the animals of the forest. We weren’t even created to look like angels. We are totally created in God’s image.

We are more like God than any living thing.

Cling to this. Never feel you are inferior to anyone. God created man and woman and said there were create equal.

When you look in the mirror realizes that you are looking at God’s image. Be thankful he went as far as to create you in this way.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never,ever, give up.

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What Can Help Me Through a Tough Day?

We are so  honored to be with you each day sharing hope. Our outreach has grown at a tremendous pace. We are averaging over 100 new subscribers a day. We just past 103,200 in followers. That’s because people are searching for hope and we provide it.

We are in a new promotion. The person who is our 105,000 will wins some nice prizes. That is only 1,800 away It goes very fast so don’t miss out. 

_____________________________________

Doug Bolton, the founder of Signs of Hope, is writing  a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, PTSD, and many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. We need to help stop those statistics. Be looking for more updates about the new book. 

________________________________________

+ Update! The book has been sent to my editor this week. Now I wait and see how many red marks she will have in it. 🙂

There will be some incredible interviews with veterans in this book. Up to twenty different veterans agreed to let me ask them some very personal questions. Some answers will have you in tears.  

____________________________________________________________________

It has been a hard week for me. I am having trouble with fluids building up around my heart and in my lungs. My Cardiologist has increased my “water pills,” but it doesn’t seem to be helping too much.

This is not something new to me. I have had trouble with fluid build up for several years now. It is a part of life I would like to get rid of,  but it hangs around like long lost relatives who come visiting, unannounced, and want to stay forever.

Enough of my pity party stories for today.

How are you doing? Have you been sliding down a slippery slope? Are there days you would rather stay in bed, and not face the day? Do you seem to be taking one step forward and two steps backwards?

You are not alone, my friend. Life doesn’t always come out the way we want it each day.

So, how can we get out of the muck and mire of life and survive?

Here are some things I have learned:

What I have Learned

  1. I have learned that your side of the story isn’t always the best side.
  2. I have learned that when people are trying to help-let them.
  3. I have learned that you really aren’t on an island alone. God is everywhere. He is probably right there with you enjoying the vast oceans he has created.
  4. I have learned that you don’t need to tell anyone your ailments. They have enough of their own.
  5. If have learned that if you are hurting, the best thing you can do is go to someone else who is hurting, and help them smile and therefore you smile back.
  6. I have learned that good friends are worth all the gold in the world.
  7. I have learned that tough love is sometimes needed actually help someone.
  8. If have learned that you do not have to try to cure the world and everything in it. God is in charge.
  9. I have learned that some of our choices are wrong. Learn from them and adjust.
  10. I have learned that hope shines bright in the darkness of light. (Learned from Sara Young: Author of Jesus Today.)
  11. I have learned all the storms that come your way are for a purpose. Some will be raging storms, like health, others will be winds that you can face with perseverance.
  12. I have learned that not everything that looks hopeless really is.
  13. I have learned I can only control things I can control. Good Yogi Berra line but mine just the same.)
  14. I have learned that hope is the only four letter word that over comes anxiety, fear, or depression.
  15. I have learned that if we threw all of our problems into a pile, and saw everyone else’s we’d grab ours back. (From my daughter-in-Law whom I call princess. There’s a reason.)
  16. I have learned that I cannot avoid trials, but they often help me grow.
  17. I have learned that the innocence of a little child can brighten my day.
  18. I have learned that in every season and in every change in life, God is there.
  19. I have learned that I should never forget God’s promises.
  20. I have learned of a place where sin and shame are powerless.
  21. I have learned at God’s Name Mountains roar and crumble.
  22. I have learned that this world is great, but heaven is greater.

 

 I hope these things I have learned will help in some way.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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There Are Threads of Hope if You Look

Threads of Hope

Linda S. Clare

“And He has said to me, ‘My grace is sufficient for you, for power is perfected in weakness.’” –II Corinthians 12:9 NIV

 

I’m acquainted with a wonderful mother who recently posted on Facebook that she’d goofed, big time. A devout Christian, she’d mistakenly outlined her son’s latest substance abuse crisis in a public rather than a private forum, embarrassing all involved. In her apology, she begged those who’d read the post to forget, it or at least refrain from discussing it. I never saw the post in question, but I sensed her humiliation at exposing her not-so-perfect life. This mother’s pain was palpable and familiar. Although I wept with her, it’s shown me again why the strongest hope is often made of the worst weakness.

I know how it feels to show your strong side to the world while some calamity threatens to swallow you whole. For those of us with addiction or mental health issues—our own or those of loved ones—we not only ignore the elephant in the room, we tell ourselves that elephants are overrated. We say, “Stand back! I got this,” even if we’re marching into battle feeling very alone. In our culture, admitting weakness often gets you punched in the nose.

Sometimes God gives us super human strength. That’s grace in action. Other times, we go it alone. We pray for protection, for healing, for blessing even as we present our “game face” to the world. We “battle” cancer, as if willpower can beat the big “C.” We present the perfect picture, even when we’re falling apart.

The poor mom who posted the private info must have worried about looking weak. She’d placed her family in the cross hairs of a judgmental society, inviting strangers to shame, blame or even claim her faith was insufficient. I don’t blame her—it’s happened to me.

I once worked in a Christian bookstore, restocking everything from Bibles to greeting cards. I was grateful for the job—in addition to supporting our family, my left arm’s lifelong paralysis from childhood polio made some simple tasks a little trickier for me. OK, a lot trickier. Still, I never called attention to my disability and always wore an “I got this” face to customers.

One day two women came into the bookstore, where I was straightening greeting cards. After I asked if I could help them find something, one woman leaned closer. She whispered, “God would heal your arm—if you had more faith.” The women left the store while I stood there, waiting for my head to explode.

Later in the breakroom, I cried hot tears of anger and confusion. I railed at God. On the job, I’d never asked for any special treatment. At work, my daily attitude was “I got this.” I had no idea how to make my faith the size it needed to be.

I never saw those women again. But for years after, I couldn’t give myself a break. Then I developed the late effects of polio. Pain and fatigue dogged me, yet I kept overworking my sore muscles. When family members developed substance abuse and mental health problems, I was as determined as that mother on Facebook to show the world how strong I was.

Then one night I dreamed of an abyss, with a single gossamer thread stretched taut across it. The hole was the blackest black, a velvet chasm of despair, while the thread glimmered in the low light. My thread of hope was so fragile, so bare, it would surely break under the weight of the disasters in my life.

Too terrified to say, “I got this,” I stood at the far end of this yawning chasm. I was naked and afraid, all right. Tattered hope stretched out before me but the thread slipped my grasp. The black hole snapped its jaws.

I know better than to put a lot of energy into interpreting dreams. Yet in this one, a hand suddenly appeared, a hand of light and pure love, if that’s possible. Discouraged by broken hope, I stood before this Love-light.

Darkness sneered at me. Fool—all is lost. For proof, just look at your addicted family members or that withered arm. Why bother to hope at all?

I understood that some hard things might never be healed this side of heaven. Why God allows suffering on earth is an age-old mystery. Darkness again whispered, “Abandon hope.” In that moment, I had to choose either my own strength or God’s weakness. The outstretched hand waited.

I chose weakness.

As feeble as I was, I reached for that hand of Light. Something—Someone—transported my failing body across the canyon, fortifying hope as it went. I had the sense I was being carried through the pain and mistakes and dumb moves of my life—and I need not claim any strength of my own.

When I awoke, nothing had changed. My body still ached. My family’s battles with substance abuse and diseases and mental health were as real as they’d ever been. The mother from Facebook no doubt still agonizes over her precious son, and if I were still working at the bookstore, those same women might still scold me for the smallness of my faith.

But everything had changed. Despair can wear hope thin, but God’s grace gives hope its strength—power perfected in weakness. To get past life’s pain, I must stand at the chasm’s edge every day. Learn to let go of the “I got this” mentality that keeps me from recognizing God when He offers me His hand. Threads of hope get stronger as Jesus carries me through, and as I lay aside my strength, He gently allows weakness to prevail.

The trials you face may be far bigger than mine. Maybe you’re much better at surrendering to God than I’ve ever been. But real strength is perfected in weakness. If you need a thread of hope today, put your hand in His hand and He will carry you through. “Trust Me,” He says, “I got this.”

 

Linda Clare

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